Monday, May 25, 2015

Built, Not Dug: KTK Tunnel Was Left as an Empty Space in an Artificially Constructed Claystone Hill in the Bosnian Pyramid Complex

by Jock Doubleday


On May 14, 2015, a KTK Visoko employee named Muhamed kindly offered to show me an ancient tunnel, the entrance to which is on the edge of the property.  

KTK Visoko is a leather processing plant that was closed for 20 years during the Rothschild/U.N./Serbian war against the Bosnian people. A company called Prevent purchased the clothing plant in June 2014, but the factory continues to have a largely abandoned look.


KTK Visoko leather processing plant, abandoned for 20 years because of the
Rothschild/U.N./Serbia
war against Bosnia, and only recently purchased by Prevent.

Muhamed and I walked across the empty factory grounds toward the Bosna River, a large river that meets the Fojnica River nearby. 
 
Approaching KTK

On the southwestern bank of the Bosna River, just below the tunnel entrance, an ancient artificial claystone block lay deeply embedded into the hill just above water level. The block was steeply inclined into the artificial claystone/clay hill. This was the first clue that the hill in which KTK Tunnel found itself was not a natural feature of the landscape but an ancient built structure.
Structurally inclined 1) claystone block and 2) clay layers composing an ancient artificial hill on the southwestern bank of the Bosna River in Visoko, Bosnia


Structurally inclined 1) claystone block and 2) clay layers composing an ancient artificial hill on the southwestern bank of the Bosna River in Visoko, Bosnia


Structurally inclined 1) claystone block and 2) clay layers composing an ancient artificial hill on the southwestern bank of the Bosna River in Visoko, Bosnia


Structurally inclined 1) claystone block and 2) clay layers composing an ancient artificial hill on the southwestern bank of the Bosna River in Visoko, Bosnia

Exploring KTK



On the southwestern bank of the Bosna River, two tunnel entrances can be found at a height above the river of approximately 10 meters. (Only the main tunnel entrance is depicted, because its cousin entrance about 15 meters to the left at the same level could not be accessed due to the steepness of the hill at that point.)


KTK Tunnel entrance on the bank of the Bosna River.
Note artificial clay layers 1) inclined into the hill to assure
structural strength and 2) inclined toward the tunnel itself.
The modern wooden frame has no support role.


The left side of the outer tunnel entrance shows steeply inclined structural clay layers composing
an ancient artificial hill.


The left side of the outer tunnel entrance shows steeply inclined structural clay layers composing
an ancient artificial hill.


Left side of the outer tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined
clay layers composing an ancient artificial hill


Left side of the outer tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined
clay layers composing an ancient artificial hill



Left side of the outer tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined
clay layers composing an ancient artificial hill



Left side of the outer tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined
clay layers composing an ancient artificial hill



Left side of the outer tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined
clay layers composing an ancient artificial hill


Left side of the outer tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined
clay layers composing an ancient artificial hill


Right side of the outer tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined
clay layers composing an ancient artificial hill


Right side of the outer tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined
clay layers composing an ancient artificial hill


Ceiling of tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined clay layers support ceiling layers


Ceiling of tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined clay layers support a single piece of ceiling clay


Ceiling of tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined clay layers support a single piece of ceiling clay


Ceiling of tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined clay layers support a single piece of ceiling clay


Ceiling of tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined clay layers support ceiling clay layers


Ceiling of tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined clay layers support ceiling clay layers


Ceiling of tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined clay layers support ceiling clay layers


Ceiling of tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined clay layers support ceiling clay layers


Ceiling of tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined clay layers support ceiling clay layers


Ceiling of tunnel entrance: Structurally inclined clay layers support ceiling clay layers
Ceiling of tunnel entrance composed of structurally inclined clay layers
  
Government-mandated support posts and beams. The clay pieces that have broken off over time collect on the flat wooden "roofs" and eventually collapse them, thus creating life-threatening danger for visitors. Without the government's interference, only one clay piece at a time would fall, a circumstance manageable with a simple hard-hat. 


Government-mandated support posts and beams. The clay pieces that have broken off over 
time collect on the flat wooden "roofs" above the posts and eventually collapse them, thus creating life-threatening danger for visitors. Without the government's interference, only one clay piece
at a time would fall, a circumstance manageable with a simple hard-hat.
 


Government-mandated support posts and beams. The clay pieces that have broken off over 
time collect on the flat wooden "roofs" above the posts and eventually collapse them, thus creating life-threatening danger for visitors. Without the government's interference, only one clay piece
at a time would fall, a circumstance manageable with a simple hard-hat.
 


Government-mandated support posts and beams. The clay pieces that have broken off over 
time collect on the flat wooden "roofs" above the posts and eventually collapse them, thus creating life-threatening danger for visitors. Without the government's interference, only one clay piece
at a time would fall, a circumstance manageable with a simple hard-hat.
 


Government-mandated support posts and beams. The clay pieces that have broken off over 
time collect on the flat wooden "roofs" above the posts and eventually collapse them, thus creating life-threatening danger for visitors. Without the government's interference, only one clay piece
at a time would fall, a circumstance manageable with a simple hard-hat.
 


Government-mandated support posts and beams. The clay pieces that have broken off over 
time collect on the flat wooden "roofs" above the posts and eventually collapse them, thus creating life-threatening danger for visitors. Without the government's interference, only one clay piece
at a time would fall, a circumstance manageable with a simple hard-hat.
 


Government-mandated support posts and beams. The clay pieces that have broken off over 
time collect on the flat wooden "roofs" above the posts and eventually collapse them, thus creating life-threatening danger for visitors. Without the government's interference, only one clay piece
at a time would fall, a circumstance manageable with a simple hard-hat.
 


Government-mandated support posts. The clay pieces that have broken off over time
collect on the flat wooden "roofs" above the posts and eventually collapse them, thus creating life-threatening danger for visitors. Without the government's interference, only one clay piece
at a time would fall, a circumstance manageable with a simple hard-hat.
 


Second tunnel entrance, inaccessible from the outside because the hill is too steep


Second tunnel entrance, inaccessible from the outside because the hill is too steep


One piece of level claystone composes the ceiling


One piece of level claystone composes the ceiling


One piece of level claystone composes the ceiling


One piece of level claystone composes the ceiling


One piece of level claystone composes the ceiling
















































 































When Was KTK Tunnel Built, and Who Built It?

 

Clearly KTK tunnel was not built in modern or Roman times. 

Building a tunnel-containing hill -- out of anything, but in this case out of clay and claystone layers -- that rises 60 feet above a river has no precedent in modern or Roman construction. 

Further, there would be no reason for Romans or modern builders to build a tunnel with a ceiling height of between 10 and 15 feet.

With its extremely high ceiling, KTK Tunnel is an enigma. Why would human beings 5 to 6 feet tall build a tunnel twice their height? 

Of course, there is copious paleontological evidence that humans have walked the earth who were anywhere from 9 feet tall to more than 25 feet tall. So the tunnel could have been built for 9-to-10-footers. 

However, some of the passageways in Ravne Tunnel Labyrinth, which is part of the same pyramid complex that KTK Tunnel is, have ceiling heights of only 3-5 feet. 
 
Thus, perhaps the tunnels were built, not for negotiation, but for something else.



Why Was KTK Tunnel Built?


We are left with the question: "Why would an ancient civilization build a claystone hill with empty space in the form of a high-ceilinged tunnel?"

We can give a partial answer to that question.

The entrances to KTK are 30 feet above the height of the Bosna River in springtime. The ancient hill -- and the other, much larger, structures in the Bosnian Pyramid Complex -- were built on what had been a level plain. If the tunnel entrance had not been placed high up, water would have flooded it immediately. 

The ancients' solution to the problem of tunnel building, in this case, was to create their own hill, a hill that would protect the tunnel from flooding.

Of course, we still haven't answered the question of why they wanted to build a tunnel in the first place. Mysteries abound.

If you have any ideas on this subject, or if you have heard of or visited another tunnel that was built, not dug, please drop a line to the author.

*   *   *   *  

Jock Doubleday is a writer and videographer interested in
ancient civilizations. Some of his videos of various aspects 
of the Bosnian Pyramid Complex can be viewed here: Archaeological Park

To contact Jock Doubleday, please write:
jockdoubleday dot writer at gmail dot com














































































1 comment:

John Skotz said...

Hi much-loved your videos. Not sure if you have heard of what happens when u erect a pyramid near a water table.most structures that have been made create a natural spring
in the center of dirt floor. I have coined it the pyramid ponding effect.it all makes so much sense when you realize that pyramids were built by the ancients on baby earth to assist in the development of life.the bosnian pyramid complex back in the day it when it was functioning at its peak performance.it Produced massive amounts of water for consumption and the perfect irrigation system caused by lunar high and low tidal affects
I have been following all your video and all of it totally supstanciate my water pyramid theory. I think it's important that all realize that the bosnian cave system is a huge
water system assisted by pyramids powered water delivery system. So don't be dissapionted when they get to the end of the tunnel system and it drops into a huge hole in the ground that at one time used to be full off water